Today, kickboxing is one of the most common and famous martial arts, spread all around the world. However, it originates from Japan (as Japanese kickboxing), but the version we all see and train today actually started out in the Netherlands. The history of this sport is somewhat long, but many of us actually want to know the pros and cons of kickboxing.

Pros of kickboxing

We’ve all seen the kickboxers fighting and we envied their athletic bodies. What we didn’t realize, however, is that we can get both those skills and bodies if we decide to pursue kickboxing. Even though it may sound violent to some people, kickboxing is actually a great sport if you want to activate every muscle in your body at the same time. It combines simultaneous movements of your arms and legs, which makes it a great cardio workout. Even though it seems like you’re only punching the bag (or people), punches and kicks require plenty of strength. With every punch or kick, your whole body works on directing the strength into your arms or legs for what you will need a strong core as well.

One training session usually lasts for an hour and each one is extremely energetic which will burn plenty of calories. Besides building stronger upper, lower and core muscles, kickboxing will improve your respiration and circulation since you will have to learn how to properly breathe with each punch. Thus, your heart muscle will get stronger thus preventing heart diseases and diabetes. Besides being highly beneficial for your body, kickboxing will do wonders your mental health, as well. It alleviates stress in the best possible way and boosts your self-confidence. Plus, you get to learn how to defend yourself.

Given that kickboxing started spreading from the Netherlands, it is safe to assume that they have some of the best fighters and gyms (some of them still work from the very beginning, in the 1970s). However, this sport is widely spread in every country in the world. Australia has some of the best gyms and fighters from everywhere and it’s still developing. Workouts might differ from gym to gym and some gyms even offer personal trainers. For example, in Australia, you can sign up for a kickboxing trainer in Adelaide who will come to your home and completely adjust the workout to your needs and abilities.

Cons of kickboxing

When starting your kickboxing workout, you will get pumped up. It will raise your adrenaline because it is intense and fun, thus helping you with your desired weight loss. That’s where the first mistakes might occur as you will want to train harder and harder, so you can easily end up with some serious muscle injuries. You need to give your body enough time to adjust to the workout regimen and only gradually increase the intensity. Also, since it is hard on all of your joints, you have to be careful when performing punches and kicks. If you have any muscle and joint problems, kickboxing is probably not the best option for you, but if you are really determined to do kickboxing consult your doctor first. In such cases, it is probably best to start with a personal trainer who can adjust to you and only when you are confident enough, start with the proper group workouts. Another downside is that you will get punched a lot - it’s all part of the kickboxing. However, learning how to defend yourself is invaluable, so don’t give up on such a beautiful sport that easily.

Just like any sport, kickboxing has its pros and cons. However, no other sport can provide such an intense and somewhat fun core and cardio workout. The only thing to watch out for is not to hurt your muscles and joints by performing the kicks and punches improperly. Always listen to your coach and don’t give up easily if you do get hit. Remember, the point is to learn how to take the punch.

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