As a transition from conscripts I would like to offer up the next of my proposals on ways to change society for the better. There are currently five federal service academies (West Point, Annapolis, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine), I believe that the federal government could benefit from building a sixth, the United States Civic Service Academy. This four year college would be run similar to the current service academies with some obvious differences:.

Students would apply to this four year school in the same manner as the other service academies - they would need to get an appointment from a congressman, senator, vice president, or president. They would then apply to the school.

The school's faculty would be primarily made up of federal employees who applied to teach - in similar fashion that military officers apply to teach at the other service academies. This would mean that members of NSA would be teaching computer science, members of the FBI would be teaching police administration, former white house staff would be teaching political science. This would give students a very real perspective of what the government needs and has to offer, as well as giving them excellent connection for future endeavors.

Upon graduation, students would be required to work a minimum of 6 years as a federal employee of some capacity.

Dress code would include suit and tie for men and business formal for women.

In place of the normal military duties that cadets at military academies perform, students at this academy would be tasked with weekly community service.

@Dave - didn't make it mandatory, figured I'd let someone else jump in front of that bus.

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Tags: Academy, Civic, Employee, Federal, Service, Student, Work


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Comment by Lyle McDonald on February 7, 2010 at 12:46pm
This is a neat idea, though I do take a few issues with it. I like the fact that it would be run in a manner similar to the military-service academies; having an honor code as strict as those for cadets and midshipmen would do a world of good for the future of our government. I'll be a plebe at the Naval Academy next year, and I'm excited that I will be around people who value honor, duty, and service as much as I do.
I think, though, that having the same congressional-nomination procedure that the military-service academies have might interfere with the goal of producing solidly respectable public servants. Remember that the graduates of the USCSA will be bureaucrats and politicians in training, so having the political aspect of admission might introduce conflicts of interest and other unsavory politicking. On that subject, I'm not at all against USNA, USMA, USAFA, and USMMMA removing the nomination requirement, as USCGA has. I understand that it has its benefits, in that it achieves complete geographic representation and that it adds another step to weed out the less-dedicated candidates, but it also prevents the appointment of hundreds of qualified candidates every year.
My other issue with USCSA is that it will train bureaucrats. Bureaucrats...ones who will undoubtedly be more competent, more reliable, and more honorable, but nonetheless bureaucrats.
On the whole, I support the idea of USCSA and am hopeful that within the next decade or so, the public will consider it an important issue.
Comment by Native Son on January 27, 2010 at 11:15pm
A pleasant idea, but seems a bit French, no? I mean like their Ecoles. Two problems with your proposal.
First, there will be a huge donnybrook over who will run the civil service academy.
Second, what you propose sounds on its surface to be a training school for bureaucrats...and now you've just sent every federal legislator either running for cover or adamantly opposed to such an academy on philosophic grounds.

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