Ian McPhee

The Manly Art of Baking.

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The Manly Art of Baking.

A place for all the bakers out there. Come to discuss breads and the art of baking, e.g. things that have worked out or things that you just can't get to work. Open to the beginner and the artisan and everyone in between!

Members: 252
Latest Activity: Dec 22, 2016

Discussion Forum

Gluten Free Bread

Started by Dave P. Last reply by Mongoose Dec 2, 2016. 2 Replies

Flaky Pie Crusts-Not!

Started by StaggerLee. Last reply by Poe Dameron Nov 27, 2016. 7 Replies

Yeast - what type and storage

Started by Jeff Sandstrom. Last reply by Salt Dragon Jul 17, 2015. 5 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Salt Dragon on December 22, 2016 at 3:13pm

Just want to pass on a recipe for Breakfast Cookies which has been a hit with my kids as well as work out buddies at the gym:  nutritious, not too sweet and a fair amount of protein to boot.  And who doesn't want to eat cookies for breakfast?  I haven't converted it into scale measurements like I prefer, but to the metric world use 2.5 dl for 1 cup. 

Ingredients
  • 2 1/2 cups gf oats
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 3/4 cups warm water
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup sunbutter 130 g
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 tsp. unrefined sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/4 cup ground chia (or flax) seeds
  • 1/2 cup chopped cranberries (other add-ins: chocolate chips, coconut, seeds, nuts)
Instructions
  • Combine the oats, sorghum, water and lemon juice in a bowl. Cover and let sit 24 hours.
  • Preheat oven to 350*F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • Add the honey, salt, soda and flax seeds to the oat mixture. Mix well.
  • Stir in the add-ins.
  • Scoop mounds onto the prepared baking sheet (as large or as small as you like).
  • Bake for 15 - 20 minutes (less time for smaller cookies, more time for larger cookies).
  • Let cool.
  • Store in sealed container in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer for up to a year.
Comment by J. D. on August 21, 2016 at 1:16pm

I live in Las Vegas, and the high heat here is precicely why I'd love to have an outdoor oven.  I never let the heat keep me from cooking outside.  I don't mind the heat and sweat if it keeps my power bill down.  I have heard there are solar-powered ovens that can get up to 350 degrees, but I have not actually looked into it very closely yet.  I should, since I could bake my sandwich bread in it and keep all the heat outside.

Comment by Poe Dameron on August 21, 2016 at 12:17pm
If Arizona weren't too hot to cook outside I would save up the money to buy myself a pizza oven
Comment by Bandaid Commando on August 20, 2016 at 11:51am

I'm looking for an outdoor oven that will be good for baking bread.  All I have been able to find are pizza ovens.  Are there any suggestions.  I am open to building plans but I hope to be moving soon so I don't want a permanent brick oven.  Any and all help will be appreciated.

Comment by Poe Dameron on April 11, 2016 at 11:04pm
I haven't made homemade bread in a while. I've mostly been baking pies,cakes, and cookies lately, and plan on baking a triple berry pie entirely from scratch very soon
Comment by J. D. on June 8, 2015 at 11:41am

Rick:  A lot of things could be having an impact on how well your bread rises.  One of the key things to consider is what type of yeast you're using and how it is stored and handled.  How long you knead your dough also matters a great deal, as does the temperature of the water, what type of flour you use, and how much water is in the dough.  If you switch between bread flour and all-purpose flour for yeast bread, the amount of water has to change as well.  Bread flour not only has more of the proteins that make gluten, but also contains more ash, which make it necessary to use more water to get the dough to the same consistency.

Comment by J. D. on June 8, 2015 at 10:46am

If you're new to baking, I strongly suggest you start small and learn to bake some basic sandwich bread before trying to tackle something as daunting as sourdough.  There is an art to baking bread, and it helps a lot to learn how the dough should feel and behave during mixing, proofing, and so on.  A good sourdough starter is something you need to be truly committed to and that needs a lot of attention and care to keep going, and you would need to bake with it on a consistant schedule.  If you do insist on tackling sourdough right out of the gate, I suggest you make your starter from whole rye flour.  I'm told that starters made from whole-grain rye flour are the most likely to develop properly and tend to have the most sour flavor down the line.  Unfortunately, few people have ever had a true, strong, sourdough bread with a real tang to it, and the stuff sold in the bakeries of most grocery stores is not true sourdough bread at all.  If you'd like recipes for either sandwich bread or a good rye starter, let me know and I'll pass mine along.  I make and sell bread all the time to friends and family, as well as for myself.  I haven't bought a loaf of bread from a grocery store in nearly 10 years.

Comment by David Botts on June 8, 2015 at 9:03am

Hi guys, I am new to this group and new to trying to bake. I was wondering if there were any suggestions about baking sourdough bread? I love the bread and want to try to make some.

Comment by Michael J. K. on October 20, 2014 at 8:26am

chip can I have some of that apple charlotte lol looks good

Comment by John on October 5, 2014 at 11:07pm

Looks fantastic; congrats on making it from scratch.

 

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