Since there has been some discussion of Pirsig's book and its subject matter, I thought that some discussion was warranted. After reading the book a second time (the first I did not get a lot out of it becuase I was reading it as a travel log) I came away with a better understanding of the way I work (I wired as a Romantic).
However, when trying to research the Romantic mind and how one can succeed with it, I haven't come across much. Seems that Classically-wired men think in a more detailed manner and thus can be more successful? How can a Romantic train oneself to be more detail oriented and driven?

I often think that because I am Romantically-wired, I have interests in mant things, but I get bored at the details about how those things came to be.
-Flight: I love aviation and flying, but my first attempt at ground school was wrought with troubles because there is so much that goes into flying... I just wanted to fly.
-Beer: I love beer, have a good palate and enjoy a variety of beer. But the brewing process bores me.

Thoughts? What else di you men get out of the book?

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Excuse me. This is about Robert Pirsig's "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".
I got a huge amount from this book. It sticks with me that on more than one occasion, Pirsig outlines the classical/romantic divide, then asserts (rightly, in my opinion) that neither is wrong. Further than this, I would say that neither is necessarily more detailed than the other. The classical thinker is more technically minded, the romantic thinker is more aesthetically minded.

If you want to bring something outside of your natural sphere of comprehension into it, the best way is through analogy..I'm not going to take this point any further, though, as I don't think that's what you're getting at! I am naturally quite interested in the forms and forces and ideas behind things like flight and brewing beer. I recognise that many people find all that very dry, but I have no idea how you'd make it more appealing!

I'm a musician and lyricist, yet much of my job is technical and benefits from a (half-baked) understanding of physics. In this respect and others I somewhat straddle the divide between romantic and classical mindsets. I still think that the distinction is an enlightening one, though. Once you start seeing the world in these terms, it's impossible to stop!
This book is one of my favorites and helped me gain much understanding about myself and the nature of things. The most important thing I took away from it are the statements about Quality. Quality is something that we all understand, we all know what it is, but are unable to define it because it's based on a combination of individual and communal perceptions (if that makes any sense). It's what drives us to do good in our lives. Quality is not something that comes easy, we have to work for it. I'm finding more and more that the things I have to work hardest for are the things most worth having.

I've also found that many of the principles outlined in the book (especially those revolving around Quality) overlap with those of many other philosophies and religions. I believe it's important to find these common through-lines so that we can gain understanding about and relate to each other and maybe find some peace.
I, also, got the classical and romantic breakdown of personality types. Though, I find myself to be both. And I got most of the "qualtiy" thing. But what I took away most of all was a desire to learn more about philosophy. So, I aquired some audio books that are introductions to philosophy. I think after I have listened to them I will listen to this book again. I think it is just a great book that says "hey, here's a good way to look at life".

What's wonderful about this age we live in is the ease with which we can educate ourselves in most areas. For me to be able to instantly download audio books on an intro to philosophy because this book inspired me is amazing. And they are lectures from highly accredited university professors. Now granted, it is just an intro and I will not be on par with some of the fellows over in our "Philosophy group". But at least I can better comprehend that of which they speak. See, I'm already starting to talk like a philosopher...ha ha ha...just kidding....but it does stick with your thinking after listening to them for a while.

I think this is a great group. I'm at a time in my life where I can delve into so many subjects that interest me that I didn't have the time for before. I'm 53, recently divorced, and my kids are just about out of the house. I find I have a lot of time on my hands and like to remain constructive. Of course, now that I think of it, most of my listening takes place during my half hour commute to work which is perfect because they are half hour lectures (24 of them). But our internet has so many resourses on so many subjects. Much of it downloadable audio or print. Which is great because then I don't have to sit in front of the monitor. Ok, I don't mean to hijack your topic here...sorry. Too much coffee and babbling...lol. This is a good book!
It's a great thing to have the time (and inclination, after the average working day) to be able to teach yourself anything at all! I'm only 23, but lucky enough to have a job which involves a lot of waiting around. I think I read this book while waiting around..

I never went to university/college because I had this job opportunity, and I had the nagging feeling for a few years that I should have gone. I felt intellectually unfulfilled. Having read "Zen.." I feel sure that going to college straight after school would merely have been adherence to the commonly held notion that it is inherently good to go. Ironically, I would have extinguished my desire to learn. I needed the break from formal education to refresh my palate, so to speak. Pirsig's idea of eliminating grades seems fantastic to me. Without that incentive, one would only learn for learning's sake. Many of my friends would not have wasted time and money starting courses that they didn't really want to do.

Anyway, I'm rambling. My point is, autodidactism has filled a hole in my life and "Zen.." helped me understand why I need it.

William, do you have a link for those philosophy lectures?

hmm.. s

so there are just two versions of different people?


these are old ideas and old ideas can twist and turn into new ideas and ways mixed from both or completely new. lets say your parents are romantic and classical
im sure some child would come out with a mixed spirit.

 

the world is how you see it
nothing is wrong or right
just more or less wrong or right.
depending on where you stand and what you focus on.

 

i would think that is right

 

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