If you attended college(s), which one(s) did you go to? 

How'd you like it?

What was your major?

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I graduated The university of Washington in Seattle where I received a degree in communications as an undergraduate.  I remain  a proud Husky. It was and is a fantastic university with many outstanding departments.  The campus is spectacularly set along lake Union with views of Mount Rainier as you walk the quad on a sunny day ( which in Seattle are precious). Aside from that you are in Seattle, truly great city.

The college search is a huge process. i remember my own, and went through it last year with my daughter, this year with my nephew, and am starting with my son who is returning from a  East Cost college tour he took with my daughter. You have to find the match that is right for your interests,and skills.You are a pretty spectacular young man, and the world will be your oyster.

Thanks for the kind words Stein.

Where are you from, might I ask? Did you go far away from home to attend college?

Well when i first started I had been living in Portland, Oregon, which was only three hours away. Then my family moved to Texas, My daughter is in college on the East coast, which is quite a distance.

Three hours is about how far the college that I'm looking at is. Seems like a good distance to me: Far enough to be away, close enough to get back fairly quick in an emergency.

How was the distance for you? Before the family moved, that is.

Far enough away, but close enough in case of emergency, Iwas away from home for sure.

I started going to Franklin Institute of Technology in Boston, where I majored in Electrical Technology. It was my first foray into the college life and I really loved it. I wish I learned what i really wanted to do after I got out.

Then I went to Florida and attended Full Sail University, I took audio engineering there and business. I really liked it there but what I went for wasn't my calling or primary calling anyway, plus I wanted to to be home near Boston so there really wasn't a lot of work.

Now I am back home attending Merrimack College. I love it there way more than my other 2 colleges, I'm majoring in Electrical Engineering, but I think I am also going to minor in Math and get not just a BSEE but with a CS along with it. It's challenging, tough really but I try not to dwell on it and do the best I can, I'm in my second yerar and sort of in a slump because of the courses I am taking, really it's because of Chem the major bulk of my time is devoted to getting that done.

What is "tough" exactly? How are your grades, if you don't mind me asking? And, with Chem, (I assume you mean Chemistry) is it that the class is difficult or do you simply have a lot of work to do?

By tough, I'm not really saying the material is hard, but it's different, it's different level than you think you go into plus it is your first time seeing it. It's also where some analytical thinking comes in from previous classes you had on the subject. I have an A in embedded a B in Calculus 2 which is better than that but not everything was factored into the grade. A C in chem but hopefully the test I just had will being it up a bit, and a c sh in Circuit theory 2, which also hopefully will be brought up by the test we just had. For chem what makes it difficult is not so much the subject matter, but I haven't seen chem since 2006. The stuff isn't hard it really comes to basic arithmetic, but the online homework doesn't foster learning.  

I went to Arizona State University and graduated with a Bachelors degree in communication. I really liked the flexibility of four campuses plus plenty of online classes that made it easier to work a full time job while attending. You can't beat the weather and there is plenty to do in Arizona including hiking, skiing up north, a day at the lake, pub crawling on the light rail (if you are legal drinking age and are not neglecting classes!).

I stayed at home with the folks and went to SUNY Stony Brook. It's a 90 minute train ride to the greatest city in the country and the money I saved on room and board I used to study abroad in both Shanghai, China and Nice, France.

I studied for a dual degree: (Political Science): International Relations and (European) History. I also took quite a few mathematics classes, language classes (German and French) and even a couple of Engineering classes, just because they tickled my fancy. College is a fantastic time to explore, work hard and accomplish great things. I'm truly envious of your position, just starting out.

Make bold leaps, take advantage of the add/drop date (if you don't like a course you're taking after the first week), and BE FRIENDS WITH YOUR PROFESSORS. Seriously, your professors are the coolest people on the planet. They are passionate, knowledgeable and innovative. They're also fantastic people to have on your side in life. I regularly e-mail several of them, just to say "hi" or to share interesting experiences or articles I've read.

I went to UB (University of Buffalo) a SUNY school.  I studied physics, math, and Computer Science for my undergrad and then went on to my MBA.  As I was a non-traditional student (I was 34 when I started full time) I enjoyed the fact that I was not the only non-traditional student as there were several of us in the physics department.  I also enjoyed working with my professors as I worked as a lab assistant for 3 different professors two were paid work.  I think I enjoyed the student life more than many of the younger students while maintaining my work-load.

I went to a State school, where I studied Political Science and History.  After that, I continued on at the same school for my MPA.  I love political science and history, so that's what I immediately gravitated to, but it probably wasn't the best choice--career wise.  Point being, pick your major carefully, and do the right internships.  I probably should have gonge the CS route or Engineering route since they seem to be recession proof careers, but either way, I ended up hedging my bet with a few IT certifications (CCNA) that have served me well, and landed me a spot in the Public Sector where my MPA will come in handy.  

 

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