I know a lot of guys on AoM had either a bad or no relationship with their dads.  I was one of the fortunate ones.  My dad is a hard worker, in a long line of hard workers. 

I've been taking an inventory of all the things he taught me as a kid and came up with this abridged list:

1.  Saturday mornings are for doing chores.  You can hang out with your friends in the afternoon but Saturday morning we work together around the house.

2.  You learn by doing and you learn the right way of doing a thing by doing it right.  When you paint, you hold the brush THIS way because it's the right way.

3.  Keep your tools in good, serviceable condition.  A place for everything and everything in it's place.  (As an aircraft mechanic, he had tons of tools and could put his hand on any one of them at a moment's notice.)

4.  If you have nothing else to do, you can always clean.  Whether it was raking the yard or scrubbing floors with a G.I. brush, he knew how to stay busy.  Don't stand there - find something you can do.

5.  Always be prepared to help others.  I can't tell how many times he stopped to help a lady change a tire.  Sometimes he was on the way to a speaking engagement and could have sluffed it off but he'd pull his overalls out of the trunk of his car and get busy.

What did you learn from your dad or what do you think is important for us to teach to the generation that we're responsible for mentoring (either kids or other family members)?

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I had a great relationship with my Dad, He was a great guy.
Eat well, work well.
If a jobs worth doing, its worth doing well.
Always be in control of yourself.
Always be prepared to do anything, really anything, cos everything haas to be done.
Both of those are amazing lessons, every father should teach their son something similar. And thankfully, mine has.

My father taught me to always have a reason for doing something, be it work or school. Study hard so you can one day do what you love, and work hard to provide for your family. The latter, my father does very well and I hope that I can one day provide for and teach my children as well as he has me.
My father has taught me that life isn't pretty, it's not a movie, and it probably won't go your way, and it'll stay lousy until you get off your ass and make something of yourself.

He lost his job after 9/11. He is a pilot and had been flying for 15 years. When he lost his job, he had an two children and a wife to feed, a luxurious house that now he couldn't pay for, and his side of the family started excommunicating family members. I'm surprised he didn't verge on suicide, because I see that as hitting rock bottom. He's a family man, I don't think much more could bother him than his family fighting and having no apparent way to feed his kids.

He didn't whine a minute. He called his friends, asked for help, and sold mortgages until one of his best friends offered him a flying job. Now he's a Check Airmen, has been offered multiple times to be a Fleet Captain at his new flying job, and is making four times more what he ever did.

Yeah, he spent a lot of time from home, worked for days on end with no sleep, and had to work a job he knew nothing about for a while, but he got himself back on top and then some. Only until recently have I realized how hard he worked.

Doing nothing is the worst thing you could ever do , I'm honored to be his son.
My dad and I jsut started to get a good father-son realtionship back in order but my grandfather taught me many lessons here are a few
1. I don't give a no s**t and I don't take a no s**T
2. work continueously and trust only yourself in that
3. always protect your family no matter what
4.when struck first strike harder
5. follow what you believe
gotta love him cause he always would take care of me in palce of my folks
If my father's taught me only one thing which is of universal importance, it was this...

You are who you are, you do what you do, you believe what you believe, you act how you act...

...and to hell with what anyone else thinks about it.

Or in other words: Never be afraid of being an individual.
The best part about me being an adult is my dad and I get to really relax and enjoy each others company. It has opened an entire knew drawer to our relationship. Along the way he taught me some very serious lessons. I'll add the funny ones in with the serious lessons.

1. Stay close to God, Family, and Country: My dad is by far the deepest and most loving man I have ever met

2. Doing it right means doing it once.

3. Taking your time saves you long term time.

4. Help others because you want to, and not because you have to. As soon as it becomes work you lose the joy of helping.

5. Take care of your belongings. Clothes, Car, shoes, tools, house, body. He has things that are 50 years old that look great.

Now the fun ones.
1. Never date a woman in A.A.
2. If you're going to get hurt, get hurt with Mom, b/c Dad will understand and Mom wont.
3. Kick but for baby Jesus
4. If you can't have fun in church you can't have fun anywhere. We're Catholic...we used to get some looks.
Awesome. Thank you for sharing!

And I LOVE that quote!! May have to steal it... ;-)
Lots of great lessons here, many of which my dad also taught me. One thing my dad taught me that I don't see mentioned here is this:

If you agree to meet someone somewhere, whether for business or for socializing, always show up, and always show up *on time*.

Of course this is a part of being a man of your word, but it's a specific aspect that he emphasized all his life. He was a builder/contractor who owned his own company. Practically from the day he opened the doors he had more business than he could take on, and he always attributed it to the fact that he was one of the only contractors in town who people could count on to show up when he said he would.

Now, as an adult, in my book being late (or worse, a no-show) shows the ultimate disregard for the other person. It says to them "my time is more valuable than yours." And in reverse, that's exactly how I take it when someone else is late to meet me.
I had a comment, but the add to the right for "dating wealthy women" distracted me and I've forgotten what it was.
Oh yes, I remember, My dad wasn't much for advice, but he did always say "marry money."

I did not listen, and so, I have to go to work now.
Never accept mediocrity: in your work, your coworkers, your partner, in anything. If you do something, do it right or don't do it at all.

The other big lesson I remember was learning how to troubleshoot problems. Anytime I broke something as a kid, his first comment was always "so how are you going to fix it?"
This is a great thread idea! I learn a lot from my dad. He's not perfect, but he has a lot of great qualities and has taught me so much.

1.) Family isn't determined just by blood. Friends can be like brothers, and brothers can be like strangers.
2.) He taught me about chivalry.
3.) The importance of self-reliance. If you can do it yourself, why pay someone else to do it? If you can't do it yourself why not learn how to?
4.) Work smarter, not harder.
5.) If its worth doing, its worth doing right. If its not worth doing right, don't waste your time.
6.) A man ALWAYS make sure his family is taken care of. My dad worked a job he hated for 30 years so he could retire, and take care of us. Since then he's gotten other jobs when times got rough.
7.) There are some things worth fighting for. Don't throw the first punch, but throw the last one.

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