I'm currently at a community college with my general ed, and undergraduate units for a major in History ready to transfer to a university. But think more and more about my choice, I'm certain of my interest in the subject, but question my path after graduation. If I'll get my masters, and become a educator. Fulfilling my desire to be a mentor, and teach the subject which inspired me, or joining the corporate job market to acquire wealth and develop more skills.

What kind of person am I if I get a History Degree?

What jobs are available for a History Degree?

Am I setting myself up for success?

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Another challenge is that Arabic is not a singular, monolithic language. I picked up some basic Levantine-style Arabic but my accent and slang is Lebanese. It would be useless in Egypt and North Africa. Your best bet is to learn classical Arabic which could be used in places like Egypt and Arabian Peninsula and then pick a speciality based on your field of work: Maghrebian, Levantine, Peninsular, etc.

JC Penney and Sears hire History majors as do all of the major chain stores, including restaurants.  This is one of the degrees that is having major issues with un- and under- employment.  I would think long and hard after doing major research into job prospects as a history major.  Not that you have to work in your degree program but as a young person it is the major method of opening doors for employment prospects.  I don't work in my undergraduate field (physics) but I am working, for at least some part, in the field in which I got my Masters.

I read the comments before reading the OP. I would have thought the Op asked about what/how to get foreign language experience.

What kind of person am I if I get a History Degree? 

A person who is passionate about history.

What jobs are available for a History Degree?

All kinds but history is usually a base that should be complemented with other skills or credentials. For example, you could teach but that would require a background or credentials in education (unless you simply stay in post-secondary academia). You could write but you'd need to develop writing skills. You could probably work in a museum or research institute but you would need skills in curation or research. A lot of these are complementary skills that you might pick up throughout your journey towards your PHD in history or they might be things you'll need to get after the fact. But it's just like any other degree; a degree in accounting can make you an accountant, a degree in law can make you a lawyer but, realistically, there are loads of things that people with accounting and law degrees do beyond just being accountants and lawyers. It's all about the complementary skills and experience that they have to offer beyond their degrees and formal education. 

Am I setting myself up for success?

That depends on your definition of success. Are there millions to be made in the field of history? Run a Google search to see how many millionaire historians there are out there. It doesn't look good. But is spending your lifetime working in your field of passion a form of success even though your neighbours might make more money that you? Certainly, if that's how you define success. 

Thanks for you feedback

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