The Art of the Conversation has all but ceased to exist in today's generation raised on instant messaging, through decades of an emasculating culture.

Take this experiment next time your with friends: Note that after stating a non-offensive  or polarizing opinion, (what you thought a character was thinking in a movie, how you thought an exam, hike, run was difficult or fun etc) - I'll wager any dollar the next statement out of your "friend's" mouth is contradictory, argumentative, 'one-uppmanship' or outright ignores what you said in the first place.

Almost a 100 years ago Dale Carnegie taught the basics to the Art of the Conversation, and showed how it was the path to friendship and success.  How to listen, how to consider what the person said and show interest.

How should men communicate?

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A man should use is words to build up those around him and to correct those who need correcting.

You pretty much answered your own question, good book that is. Have your friends read it.

Argumentative, and one-upmanship.  Good job.

Thanks.

Awesome books, everyone should read.  I found a book he wrote on Lincoln in a university  library- fascinating.

"Decades of emasculating culture"? Sounds like BS to me, a bunch of garbage made up to complain about something. How do you measure emasculation? It seems like you're just blaming a nebulous social change (which is invented) for your perceived problems.

Vy, the entire premise of this site is a *return* to the traditional principles of masculinity.  Its very existence is predicated on an acceptance of emasculation as an unfortunate theme in our modern culture.

 

It *is* an interesting way to look at it.

It's not invented.  It's observable.  Not so much these days, though, a couple decades ago there really was an emasculation going on..  These days boys aren't neutered so they can be girls, they're neutered so they can be boys forever.

Immaterial though.  One can either observe it and complain about it, or observe it and do something about it.  This guy takes the former.

*note to OP

This post is argumentative, contradictory and displays one-upmanship.  If I hadn't thought it was worth replying to, I would have ignored it.

I don't think that 'emasculation' is a social process we can prove. Take movie heroes, a popular form of evidence for this junk theory. Masculine characters have always been popular in film. Magazines are dedicated to forming our bodies into the (quasi-impossible) shape of the manly man (usually takes expensive diets, workouts, and gadgets as well). The image of the manly man never really lost currency, even in the 60s, 70s, or 90s.

External trappings. Not internal security. I would point to the equal number of self help books/products sold to overcome the deficiencies/insecurities. There are a lot of therapists who made a lot of money off of guys like some of our regular posters due to the combined effects of WW2, 2nd/3rd wave feminism and suburbia. It may not be quantifiable, I know of no formal studies on the issue, Brett may. But, it is an observable trend.

Oh the Irony that VY responded to my post regarding proper communication ...by telling me I have "perceived 'masculinity' problems"...

 

One could argue that the point I was making is that those who respond in the manner I described, suffer the "problems" VY is referring to.  (Note implied jab.)

Straw man argument.  Muscle mags don't represent societies' treatment of men, nor are the men who idealize Jay Cutler or the rest better off as a result.

We call those guys meat-heads for a reason - I saw a lot of them in the Marines.  There are few-woman on the planet who would describe them as mentally, emotionally or socially-healthy or confidant.  

'Emasculating culture' comes from my own analysis as well as the more studied academic research of others.  Male figures in our daytime shows today are usually bumbling fools, Everyone loves Raymond is a fun one.  These are only small examples, and can be attacked, however the theme is clear.  We need to celebrate men again- to create a culture where we encourage men to grow, and take care of their families, to do an honest days work, to improve himself physically, mentally and socially. 

However, Gentlemen are not celebrated today, being a man is being misogynistic.

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