After searching I am a little surprised that Western mens' wear has come up so rarely on AoM.

How many men here own a "cowboy" outfit, whether working, authentic West, or rodeo, that you wear for special occasions or every day?

By "cowboy" I mean all Western wear not just the Hollywood version of someone who watches the north end of a thousand south bound cows. 

Several things are bringing this subject to my mind lately. 

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I live in the south and see this style dress daily but very few manage to make it look as though they aren't "Dressin' up". In order to "Cowboy up" a man must be a true country gentleman, that is a man who isn't afraid to get his hands dirty in a field and isnt afraid of ruinin his suit in order to change a ladies tire on the side of the road that stetson and spurs mean a heck of a lot more than many people know.

 

Jacob Neel - you just brought up one of my points that being what reactions do you get from dressing Western?  I get two odd reactions locally.  If we are just coming back from a SASS shoot people do not pay nearly as much attention to our clothes or even irons (it is Alaska) as they do our SASS badges:

These badges make people surprisingly nervous(?)

The other reaction that I have had more than once is random (slightly crazy) people walking right up and complaining about state politics.  Apparently Western wear is automatically associated with politicians and even worse, lobbyist.   Is this unique to here or have other people seen this? 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_wear

I live in the great state of Tennessee and it is normal to see folk nervous at seeing people in true cowboy wear but as I said in a previous reply one must not only dress cowboy but truly act cowboy. I believe that the dress simply lures em in but people can tell by how you walk, talk, and act as to whether you have really decided to "cowboy up".

What is special about wearing western?  ;)

A Stetson and a Texas tuxedo... 

I like how you wear your watch. 

I wear Wrangler jeans, boots, and a western belt with a large buckle (though not a trophy buckle as those are trophies won in competition by real cowboys) as my everyday outfit.  Though I do wear polo shirts most of the year, during winter you'll usually find me in a Wrangler "cowboy cut" twill shirt, too.

 

Very comfortable clothing, and a very put together look when it's worn with confidence.  The last photo is the closest to my style.

 

I don't usually do the hat, but I do keep a straw cowboy hat in the car for when I expect to spend some time outside.  Very fair skinned.

I weld in wranglers, ariats, and cowboy cut work shirts every day.  I just posted something along the same lines as this post but not so specific as to say cowboy attire.

I wear boots and wranglers ever day, when I'm back home in Canada I usually have plaid on, but its a little hot to long sleeves here in Australia right now, so I opt for a t-shirt most days and an Akubra instead of a stetson. Whether I'm out with the cows or going out to sunday sesh, I've always got a pair of boots and jeans on. 

   I wear my Akubra and boots pretty much every day. They look as good with a suit as they do with patched up barn jeans and a henley, so that covers most of my range of fashion.  Prior to a Cowboy Fast Draw event I was driving to, my wife had this gem for me;

    "You know, most people have to dress up for this,"...

My increased interest in Western wear came from cowboy action shooting (SASS).  As I collect more and better clothes it seems like a shame to not take more opportunities to wear them apart form a monthly Sunday shoot out in the Alaska wilderness. 

One item that I am taking a liking to are the Wahmaker buckle-back pants:

with suspenders.  I did not expect to care much for either but they have turned out to be about the best made and most comfortable pants that I own.  I have not been as pleased with the Frontier Classics version.  Also, I am not that young and fit any more but I received several compliments from Ladies on these pants even though the split top and suspenders were not showing(?)  This site has shed a bit of light on that for me: http://www.duchessclothier.com/blogs/duchess-blog-atom/4429532-scul... 

The question that I am trying to form here is roughly: "Does anyone have suggestions for where (or where not) to also wear my growing collection of clothes? 

There are suspenders under the vest. 

No.

 It's like leather biker clothing.

It looks somewhere between "compensating" and "flamboyantly homosexual". 

I really hope that this is not what anyone else here has in mind when I say "Western." 

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