I've been happy enough in my IT career for the last 14 years or so but I'm beginning to get a little fed up with it. Not the work as such but the increasing impediments to progress, I don't want to have to do an MCSE or CCNE just to move into the next step, at my stage in life I don't want to have to sacrifice my "me time" for the sake of my career and miss out on time with my kids, partner & interests.

I have looked into adult apprenticeships, but the finances simply don't add up, I couldn't support myself on the wages.

I have just passed my volunteer firefighter practical assessment & may consider applying for a career position when I get a couple of years experience on the fireground. The trouble is that I will then be 42 and most successful recruit firefighters are 25 - 35.

Has anyone in the AoM community made a radical career change later in life? How did it go?

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I changed careers in my late 40's; it was out of necessity rather than boredom (doc said reduce your stress level or you'll never see 50).  

The change really upset the applecart.  Turned the family's life upside down for a good long while.  Note however that in both "careers" I was/am self-employed and that can make things much more difficult.  

I don't see the professional firefighter thing as practical career.  You'll be the newbie at an age where many of your colleagues will be looking towards retirement from the service.   At least for me that would be far to physically demanding at 40+.  Perhaps you could roll volunteer firefighter service into some sort of gig.  

I'm happy enough & secure in my current job, but I work in a University, not necessarily an accurate representation of the "real" world. I go on courses & training to keep my current work skills up to date, for example I will be going on a course for SCCM 2012 very soon. These don't result in certificates but I do have current skills. I'm not ambitious in that I'm pretty content having a career/job that pays the bills that I don't hate going to everyday, most of my colleagues who are getting into the management stream are in their 20s & early thirties.

My partner is in the process of changing career because of an injury & it is a scary thing to do when you are in your late 30s and have kids to support.

Mine (although I made the change at 39, not my 40's) has gone excellently.

I will state that I'm also running into the "need to get qualifications" bother.  Frankly, some of qualifications are just plain old fashioned "ticket punching", because that's easy for HR and "promotion boards" to evaluate.

One thing I've noticed over time is that a lot of the training required to obtain work qualifications seems to have been designed by single or childless consultants in their mid to late 20's...the sort of folks who can take off for two to six weeks with little impact on their home life.

IT is always in a state of change.  I expect to always be having to study on the side.  Study either to keep current or for the next certification to open the next step on the ladder.  

If you want to unlock the next level you simply have to do your homework.  If you don't enjoy your location on the ladder. 

But certs are increasingly a part of work life.

You hit the issue on the head.  HR can sort your resume based on third party Certs.  It is easy to shift through candidates.  

As to why be the man in the cubical rather then the manager of them.  Simple.  The man in the cubical has set hours and set pay and he trades less pay for more time and less stress.  I have a few friends who are quite happy with NOT climbing the income & responsibly ladder any higher.  They are quite happy with the trade off.

Some of us have found our niche.  It's not so much a "ComfortZone" issue, as it's more been there, done that, don't want to do it again.  I also have had the somewhat mixed exerience of having to charge out and get mandated training and certifications, and then never, repeat never, used any of the stuff I was formally trained on or certified for.

That has jaded me somewhat on the utility of many certifications. Like many, most of my work requires some computer literacy...however, for what I do, I initially was going to have to get a particular certification that amounted to techincal instruction on the mechanical and electrical guts of that box under my desk.  My total interaction with the mechanics of the computer (for several years)?  Where's the power switch and are the cords tightly plugged in on the back of the box?

I too, know folks who are ticket-punched out the wazoo, but who can't figure out the basics of my job,or why I find it necessary to work on the odd "grunt work" task instead of the "far more interesting and important" [to them] papers.

(In the realm of IT, I know certificated folks who don't know what "GIGO" means, why databases need to be updated, or why you need to tell the troops what you just changed in the software [that half the company uses every day].)

That is very true. But we are talking about technological careers here.  For me it is part of the deal.  I understood it when I signed up for the degree and I enjoy it.  But I have hit a point in my life where I really enjoy learning.  

It is always wise to explore what type of career change you want to change to. Why? All careers have pros and cons and I know personally at age 54, I wasted too many years job hopping. Now it has come back to bite me as I have a very long resume. Job hopping causes employers to ask - will this person stick around after my company has trained them?

The old thought many have...where you get one job, and stay with it, regardless, is a sad waste of life if you ask me.

The world changes fast nowadays, and we should be adaptive with it. Don't focus on "career", focus on you, family, et al...unless you're a very small sector of jobs...doctor, actor, etc., work at a JOB to have the ability to do the things you wanna do in real life, maybe even work for yourself one day.

Oh, and NEVER get used to a certain style of living dicated by your current salary, seen way too many families shattered by that. Live smart, and frugal in your expenses, and always have a plan ready to live on less, or if nothing else, add a 2nd job while adapting to a new, more satisfying job.

 

I switched at 33yrs old, 7yrs ago, and am sure I will switch again in the next 2-3yrs. Bordeom is a killer, I prefer new challenges.

My wife gets that, and there's no issues, just be smart with your money.

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