Hi

I work for a software firm where my manager is expecting me to work on so many projects at a time. Meanwhile, I see others from my team are allocated with way too less amount of work compared to me. Its not that, I dont like my job, but it sounds like I spend around 16-17 hours a day in work. I have already escalated this to my boss and he doesn't seem to heed to what I say. I am pretty sure he is aware of the volume of work I am doing but he just doesn't seem to listen and try to ignore me..

Is there a way out of this situation? I have scheduled a meeting to talk through this tomorrow however I am pretty sure he is not going to listen.. What approach should I follow to make him take some steps.. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

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Is there a way out of this situation?

Yes. Work somewhere else. But first, figure out what the problem is, before doing anything that might make the situation worse. If you don't fix the problem, it's likely to keep repeating.

What approach should I follow to make him take some steps.

Practically speaking, you can't make anyone do anything. It's up to you to do something, if something needs to be done. But before you turn in your notice, tell me why they don't value you enough to make you happier.

If you don't know, find out. That's probably the key to the solution to your problem.

This depends a lot on your boss. I happen to own a software firm and it is really tricky to balance load with developers. Each has different skills and different level of efficiency with different tasks.

Before you go in and talk to him I recommend you think about a few things so you can make solid arguments. Nothing kills a good discussion like making a baseless statement or exaggerating the truth and have the point kicked out from under you.

You also said he won't listen. Maybe true, but try to push that out of your mind. If you go in expecting a fight it will show and you are starting off behind.

1. Try to stick to just your contribution.

While you will have to make some comparisons, try to avoid comparing yourself to others as your main point. Doing so opens you up to a rebuttal on anything you are not aware of. Do not, under any circumstances, start whining about someone else having it easier. That is a guarantee that he will shut you off. Talk about your positives, not their negatives.

2. What are you worth.

You may or may not have access to billing info, but take a look at the work you do and what they can charge for your work. If you are working for a base rate of $30 per hour, assume your actual cost, with overhead, is probably closer to $60. The company also needs to make a profit so make sure you are actually making them money before you start pushing that you are being treated unfairly.

3. How efficient are you.

I have one programmer that is about 1/2 as efficient/fast as another. Their salaries reflect this. Time alone is not a measure of what is being done. So carefully evaluate if you are truly being given much more work, or if you are just taking longer to do it.

4. Stick to your compensation not anyone else's.

If you did the calculations on #2, you will have a better idea of what you are contributing. Coming into the discussion with this figured out (and openness to being corrected) can help tremendously. If an employee walks in my office with this approach I will listen. Offer ideas that involve a change in salary and reduction in hours to level out the benefits for the effort you put in.

5. Offer improvements

A good boss will be about solving problems, but dumping a problem on them means they have to figure out what to do about it. Come in with some suggestions as to how to solve the problem. Also try to bring ideas about improving efficiency of the team as a whole. Then you have improved the team, not just dropped something else in his lap he has to deal with.

Most good bosses are not out to screw over employees, but it is not always as clear cut as it seems from your perspective. Sometimes just bringing the facts to their attention will get the ball rolling, but go in planning to be flexible and try to check your emotions at the door.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

Thank you guys! These are excellent suggestions. I will let you know how it turns out to be! thanks again!

So much depends on the boss, company health, and company culture it is hard to say. Of course you always have the option to find other work and software is still a hiring field while many others are stagnant.

Just from personal experience I'd suggest looking at the big picture. Where I used to work the division was dying.  They started putting unachievable expectations on a bunch of us, used that to pad our evaluations as underachievers, then fired the lot. Next came voluntary followed by mandatory early retirement, then layoffs and a couple of years down the road they boarded up that location completely.  I would hope that kind of shady practice is unusual but...

You should find out his personal home address. Then, shit in a plastic bag, mix with some water (double or triple wrap it so it doesn't leak through) drive down there, and splatter it on his front door. Only do this late at night/very early morning so you have the cover of darkness. Whatever you do, try not to get caught doing this.

The most productive advise I have ever heard from someone ;) Just kidding!!

Indeed, it put a smile on my face though!

Here's a thought...

...start your own software firm so you don't have to put up with this bullshit.

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