Hello, 

Since I graduated a few months ago, I've discovered the joy of not dedicating all my free time to homework. So I've downloaded and have been playing a good handful of board games on my Tablet. 

i tend to stick to older "classic" games, Chess, Backgammon, etc. 

but what's giving me issues are a few little things in a few games. 

e.i. what's the point of the doubling cube in Backgammon? It's a question that playing an OTB would be best to ask, but i haven't the chance to play with anyone. 

i also don't understand the game Go. i know it's about capturing territories, but other than that, i haven't a clue what's going on. 

anyway, are their any other games worth getting into along these lines? or what do you think about these

and what are some other favorites from the AoM guys. 

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Just googled and it sounds like loads of fun!

Settlers of Catan is a big hit at our weekly gsme night.

The doubling cube in Backgammon is used to track the stakes of the game.  In tournament play, points are earned for winning a series of games.  If you bear off all of your men and the opponent has borne of at least one, then the game is worth one point.  If he has not borne off any and/or not brought all of his men into his home table, the game is a gammon, worth two points.  If he has not borne off any, and a piece is still on the bar or your home table, that's a backgammon, worth three points.  A tournament match consists of several games played until a certain number of points is accumulated.  The player who reaches or exceeds the target score first wins the match and advances to the next round.

At any time, if you feel you have the advantage over your opponent, you can say "Double" and the opponent must either "Take" or "Drop."  If he takes, then the stakes are doubled, and your opponent gets possession of the cube, with the 2 showing face up.  He now has the option to redouble anytime later in the game, and if you take, then you get possession of the cube with the 4 facing up, etc.  If, however, your opponent drops, you win the game automatically for whatever the stakes of the game are prior to the double.  After the game is won, multiple the normal value of the game by the value showing on the cube.

Many tournaments also use the Crawford rule, in which after a game one player comes one point short of winning the match, the double cube is not used.  As an example, after game 4 Player A has 6 points and Player B has 2 points in a 7-point match, the Crawford rule applies.  If the trailing player manages to win the Crawford game, the match continues, and the double cube is reinstated.

http://www.bkgm.com/rules.html

There's a free backgammon download that can be played against the computer, and you can more clearly see how the double cube works.

http://www.gnubg.org/

thanks for that explanation, so basically it's for when people play multiple matches per game...  which clears it up for me since i assumed a game was only when one bears off all there pieces. 

Board games are badass. It's kind of unfortunate though because it is hard to find any consistent players.

Settlers of Catan for the win!

I'm a teacher and have a few games in my rooms for those study halls when kids have nothing else to do. Currently popular are Pit, Dutch Blitz and Phase 10. I also have a chess board, Scrabble and Catch Phrase.

I made this account mainly to just reply to this thread. Cribbage is a game worth learning, it seems rare to be somewhere that people don't know how to play Crib.

Also, in addition to what was already said about the doubling cube it's also good when playing for money/beer.

I've found board/card games--the real classics which aren't full of silly party rules--are amazingly fulfilling in their enduring pleasure and simplicity.  Cribbage is one of my favorites, though none of my friends yet know it so I'm restricted to playing my smartphone.  I enjoy occasional Chess and am learning Othello and Backgammon (slowly).

Go is an amazingly complex game formed on simple rules.  It involves thinking very differently from our typical, Western "go win with force/numbers" and provides a wonderful mental challenge in strategy and forethought.  I've played it (again, smartphone) for the last few years and still find every game a unique challenge.  I recommend the app SmartGo, as it not only has tutorials and reading material, but starts you off at the lowest-level ("kyu") and adapts its difficulty as you progress.  There's also all the reading material you could ever want online.

On the modern game front, Ticket to Ride is surprisingly fun, and Catan is a young classic.

I am old school (backgammon, Avalon Hill, etc...) but it is hard to find opponents. 

Has anyone played this fairly awful and hilarious game?  http://cardsagainsthumanity.com/

Played it enough to be tired of it at this point.  Much like it's family-friendly counterpart, Apples to Apples, I feel Cards Against Humanity is fun until you play it enough to recognize all the questions/answers.  After that, it feels like trying to reshape an overused joke.

My wife and I play often, along with Munchkin and Unexploded Cow. Hilarious and fun.

As far as board games go....Arkham Horror!

Arkham Horror is a fun one!

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