Hey fellas. I'm Patrick and am new to the forum.

As a Christian, I'm curious how everyone seems to balance their spirituality/religious beliefs (considering you "practice" a religion or call yourself "spiritual") while still maintaining their manliness. I ask because spirituality seems to have grown to be extremely passive in today's society. Take Jesus, for example, who is depicted as a meek and gentle wimp and not so much a man's man.

Hope my question isn't too vague. All opinions are welcome.

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I was brought up in a home where religion was much more than just something we believed; it was a way of life.  As an adult, I have chosen to hold to those beliefs after a brief time of questioning and doubt, and have never looked back.  As a man who feels strongly that all things masculine are under fierce attack in our culture, I do not see manliness and spirituality as being at all in conflict, at least, not within the relm of Christianity.  I kind of get what you're saying about Christ being portrayed as a pasafist, but I don't believe he was.  He encouraged people to get along with and love their neighbors to be sure, but he also stood up for what he believed and absolutely never backed down.  I believe the greatest weakness that many who call themselves Christians around the world have is that we do not stand up and fight harder for what we believe.  Many of us are far, far too passive when it comes to defending what we see as right and moral and good and just, perhaps believing that the conflict that is usually the result of us taking a stand is not in harmony with the teachings of Christ.  Obviously, I do not subscribe to that way of thinking.  But that, in my view, does not at all mean that spirituality and masculinity are at odds.  I see Christ as one of the greatest (if not THE greatest) example of manhood that there has ever been.  He loved little children and blessed them, he treated women with respect, charished his mother until the very last, yet he stood up to the political and spiritual leaders of his day and boldly told them how it was and pointed out the hipocracy of their teachings and beliefs, he rid the holy temple of all that defiled it, and he was willing to  pay the ultimate price, not only for our sins, but also for angering the leaders, as well as many of the people, of his generation.  That, to me, is a man I want to model my life after.

^ this guy nailed it right on the money. I couldn't have said it better myself.

Absolutely.  I hate how He is traditionally portrayed by Hollywood.  This was a strong and masculine man.

And lets not forget, his ministry didn't start until he was 30.  Up until that time he was a carpenter.  Mostly likely he was fit and strong. All those Chuck Norris jokes should be changed to Jesus.  I think Chuck would agreee.

How many people are manly enough to carry their own cross up a massive hill and then be nailed to it without making a massive scene? I think Jesus was pretty manly, 'turning the other cheek' can be manly in the right context. He certainly held himself (at least in my mind's eye) with poise and power. If you look collectively at the stories of Christ he exemplified manliness pretty well.

Don't try and separate your spirituality and manliness, it is in-congruent, instead try to look at Jesus as the embodiment of manliness. I think when you do you'll see him in a different light. When asking the question 'Was that manly?' at the end of the various stories of Christ I think the answer will normally be yes.

...not to mention Christian martyrs, saints and most holy men from other religions who endured sacrifices and pain way beyond those any normal 'man' would ever do.  In truth we mistake meekness for weakness.   Inner strength is what makes a true man, any a fool can just be physically strong as even the beasts of burden are.

Seconded.

This isn't the main forum.

It most certainly is.

You are certainly right.  I stand corrected.

the least compatible thing in my mind with being a man and religion is, ultimately, a deity is the one responsible, not you.  related is the submission necessary.  

that said, certainly there is much to admire in jesus, including his manliness.  i mean, no wimp could scatter the money-lenders like he did.  many other religious founders can also be held up for their leadership, singularity of purpose, morals, etc.  

Jesus was the ultimate man's man. He gave his life for his friends. I think that being a protector, provider, teacher, and mentor is biblical and in harmony with the teachings of Christ. Go read about Jesus in the temple when he went off  on the merchants who were selling doves and stuff. He physically fought to defend his fathers house. How much manlier does it get....I think meekness and humility basically mean you are manly, you just shut up about it and let your actions speak for you not your words.

I think worrying too much about being manly isn't manly.  It's way too much trouble, anyway. 

As an atheist who sometimes practices Zen (for the articles, of course, I don't look at the pictures...), I see no conflict at all between my spirituality and manliness.  I can still pee standing up, even after meditating, without getting any on my shoes.

Seriously, do you find anything unmanly about this?

 

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