Attractions to other Cultures and Revulsion towards other Cultures

Think about what cultures, other than your own are interesting or attractive to you. What about them is interesting or attractive to you?

Think about what cultures tend to inspire revulsion in you. What about them is revolting or repellent to you?

I think this is very interesting, on both accounts.

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2 Examples of Cultures I find Interesting and attractive

Japanese

  • Interesting and complex social structure. Has pros and cons, but never boring to study and research
  • Very refined and beautiful traditional art
  • Very enjoyable pop culture/art
  • Willingness to adopt foreign tools when appropriate, while still remaining true to themselves.
  • Interesting and beautiful language 
  • Open to modernization, while still respecting their past. 

Polynesian 

  • Very interesting variation in lifestyle and culture from island to island, despite recent divergence
  • Interesting crafts and art.
  • Interesting primitive technology
  • Wayfaring
  • Mythology
  • Despite being beaten down in many places, still have a pretty proud culture.

I'll do 2 examples of cultures I tend to respond with revulsion to later.

I love meeting and talking to the locals whenever I'm away from home. It's interesting to get other perspectives and learn about the salt-of-the-earth types in other places.

I want to go to Oceania and talk to the regular folks there. They seem generally laid back.

Rural Europe. I'd like to know how different they are from urban Europe and rural America.

I want to see the East. China, Taiwan, Japan, Mongolia. All of it.

I find East Indian/Hindu culture absolutely repugnant. Polytheism. Sacred animals. Child prostitutes. WORLD POWER BY 2020. It's all either against my core beliefs or annoying.

I'll probably think of more later.

"I find East Indian/Hindu culture absolutely repugnant. Polytheism. Sacred animals. Child prostitutes. WORLD POWER BY 2020. It's all either against my core beliefs or annoying."

I'm not going to defend India cause I'm about to trash it in another post but can we at least agree that polytheism, sacred animals and child prostitutes are hardly unique to India and/or Hinduism?

Sure they aren't. But it clashes with the whole SUPERPOWER BY 2020 narrative when they won't even take the poo to the loo. They are so backwards as a country but they think they're hot stuff. Also consider the following stereotype that holds up pretty well.

"That's a very inaccurate descriptor of "Hinduism" - the more enlightened forms of Hinduism are monotheistic and morally universalist, and while I'm not sure their theology completely complies with Christian orthodoxy, it acknowledged Christ as an "avatar" of the one universal God - Mouni Sadhu is an example of such."

It's not inaccurate. Some Hindus are clearly polytheist. Others are monotheist. Others are somewhere in between. Hinduism is a complicated religion without a definite beginning, a definite set of literature or rules, and no single definition of who is or isn't a Hindu.

Funny thing about religions. You don't get to decide for them, which ones are true or false, especially by criteria that they themselves do not look to.

I might as well say, I don't consider any trinitarian version of Christianity, to be correct, since it doesn't tie in with objective natural laws, and realities of the universe. 

Doesn't work that way. 

Doesn't change facts, of course. But religion is not about facts in the first place.

I think there might be some confusion between polytheism and animism - but thanks for clarifying this makes more sense than your prior statement. 

"there isn't a single one which is "supreme", and this tied in with the idea that there were no "universal laws" 

Many polytheistic religions tend to have gods who relate to aspects of a whole. That is, they are all a fraction of the "universal laws" - representing some part of it. Just not imbuing all of it, in one personage. 

I have seen no particular impetus towards scientific rejection in polytheistic hindus vs. more monotheistic hindus. But my sample has admittedly been limited by the individuals I have encountered here, rather than an extensive survey of the question in places with more data points. I'm just not entirely convinced that your premise holds once put to the test. I would, however, be curious to see if the more monotheistic versions of hinduism tend to be associated with higher wealth/caste individuals who accordingly have more education - that difference being more intrinsically related to scientific acceptance. 

The question of superstition and taboo is an interesting one, especially since they are not exclusive to religion at all - and I certainly don't think we can extend to 'rejection of science' 

What are your thoughts on aesthetics of religion?

Weren't you banned?

Don't​ you know already? Symmetry is godly.

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