I'm applying for a job in Hong Kong for a well known organization and the job description says that I should send the resume with expected salary ...How do you I include the expected salary in the resume ? Any ideas ? My resume is broken up in a few sections such as Objective, Education, Work Experience, Hobbies etc. ...Should I create a new section called "expected salary" ?

Tags: career, money, resume

Views: 3288

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

how do I include the expected salary in a cover letter ? any ideas ?
ok great ! thanks a lot ! this is a very good idea !
I don't believe I would ever actually state an expected salary. I would include in my cover letter some sort of statement about expecting a salary in line with my previous experience and my expected responsibilities. If they want your abilities, they will need to talk to you in order to find out what you will cost them...
What the hell does that mean? I'm getting ready to retire from the Marines in two years and am starting to stress over this. I don't get the whole "compensation in line with experience and responsibilities" mumbo-jumbo that almost all job listings have. Is there a formula somewhere that I can plug in my education, experience, qualifications, certifications...and come out with a solid salary expectation?

My fear is that I'll go through the whole interview process for a job I know I'm qualified for and not find out till the very end that the company is only willing to pay a LOT less that what I expected. I'm sure every position has a ceiling on what the company is willing to pay. That should be known up front before the interview process begins...at least that's the way it should be.

To the OP, if they ask for specific salary information and you give them some gibberish about salary commensurate with experience or whatever, I think you will look wishy-washy. Give them what they ask for. You could send them your previous salary number and where you lived and say that you expect to maintain the same standard of living. Maybe you made $75K in Topeka, Kansas...that would be chump change in Hong Kong. You might need double or triple that to maintain your standard of living in that area.
Depending on the industry, average salaries for various positions are pretty easy to research online. Yes, it will vary from region to region, like federal civil servants gets bonuses for working in certain regions. Not every employer will use that language; some will post a salary range for the position, and you can use that in negotiations with employers who are more mysterious.

You can also complete the process you describe by converting 75K of Topeka dollars to San Francisco dollars, so to speak, by using cost-of-living comparisons that are REALLY easy to find online. Then you'll have an actual number to give a potential employer.
It means "negotiable". It is exactly mumbo-jumbo that just politely says you aren't willing to tell them a number right now but that they shouldn't expect to screw you with a low salary. If you give them a "minimum" number, you will quickly find out that it exactly matches the "maximum" that they can pay.

I'd say that you should never give a salary number in an initial application. How quickly you bring it up in discussions will depend on how big an issue you think it will be for them and how big an issue it is for you.

Remember that salary in civilian life often has nothing to do with ability or experience. It's frequently more about what you negotiated when you started out with the company. Especially when you are entering a new industry, make sure you get yourself slotted into a high level in their organization, based on your abilities and not on your former salary.
I've known several people who screwed this up and found that it became very difficult to change the initial perception of them from their first hiring process. It can result in being held in a job that is really too low for what you are actually capable of doing. Once you get slotted into their structure, it can be a lot of hard work to move up. This can even carry over with you if you switch to another company in the same business. Then it will be much harder to argue why you deserve a higher salary, since clearly you were willing to work for peanuts at the last place. The new company will then offer you only a small amount more.
Start out as high up as possible when you enter a new industry. It can shortcut years of hard work to show what you can do.
I usually don't include an expect salary, I leave that for the bargaining table when they hire me
I am always hestitant to start throwing around numbers before the interview ... and, frankly, I'm usually suspicious of an employer that demands that I do so. I don't like negotiating with myself. Unless I happen to land on the right figure on the first shot, there are two possibilities -- (1) I undercut myself and offer less than they were willing to pay, or (2) I overshoot and put myself out of the running before the interview.

I will usually offer previous salaries on request, and put "negotiable" for current salary requirements.

JB
Hi JB,
Putting "negotiable" for salary requirements and mentioning previous salaries on request are good ideas .
By the way - I have no reason to be "suspicious" of this employer since the organization is internationally reputed , globally known.
Thanks all for the advice !
What a great message board !
I agree with Star Gazer. I hate putting in salary requirements but some companies require it. I usually put what I was making at my last position then note that it is negotiable.

To Jarhead. Do not undervalue yourself. I know I have and I am shocked sometimes by what some companies will pay for certain positions. I have been out of work for awhile now but I am getting a lot of interviews and I know that I'll land on my feet, in a new job, making more than I was before. This extended "vacation" has sucked but I'll come out of it better than before.
I've spent my entire working life in the military on a fixed income based on time in service and rank (which is largely based on your time in the service). I make the exact same amount of money as every single person my same rank regardless of actual responsibility, qualifications, and ability. There are some small cost of living adjustments based on location, but nothing really significant. Anyway, I have a very solid resume and expect to earn significantly more than I do now. But my concern is getting all the way to the salary negotiation stage and finding out that the company is offering $40,000 less than what I expect. I am really looking forward to a place where I get paid and promoted based on performance, not based on how long I've been around. I don't think I'll have a problem finding a job, I just wish employers published salary ranges for specific jobs.
If it means that much to you, make sure you don't leave it until the end of the process!

RSS

Latest Activity

Profile IconJohn P, Tomáš, Fernando and 46 more joined Art of Manliness
28 seconds ago
Michael J. K. replied to Christopher McLaughlin's discussion starting to box.
"Hope the boxing goes well.  I like being fit and think it will do you a lot of good.   Hope you find a place that will be a good fit.   What you do in bed with someone is none of anyone's business.  Hugs…"
1 minute ago
Profile IconRicky, Tim Dienes and 2 other members joined Joe W's group
Thumbnail

Fathers and Sons

There are groups on this site for fatherhood, but this one is specific for that special relationship that exists between fathers and sons.  Feel free to discuss matters relating to your relationship with your boy, your pop, or a guy who filled either role for you.Enjoy and God bless!See More
2 minutes ago
Ricky replied to Joe W's discussion Comparing Bodies / Looking Ahead in the group Fathers and Sons
"I never saw my father naked - and never really wanted to.  As a child there was something not talked about being naked. - though I was a beautiful child -(smile)  I saw mu dad in boxer shorts and a wife-beater undershirt a good deal.…"
2 minutes ago
Rick Shelton replied to Flavio Bossolan's discussion Tutorship
"I think a mentor in your area would be a better idea."
2 minutes ago
Tim Dienes replied to Joe W's discussion Introductions in the group Fathers and Sons
"I am single, never married, and 54. Reading all these introductions was interesting. I still suffer from the probable delusion that I have always wanted to become a father. The problem is that I tend to idealize everything, and the 24/7…"
3 minutes ago
Rick Shelton replied to Jaya Jagannath's discussion Here is Practical Explanation about Next Life, Purpose of Human Life, philosophical/religious facts, theories etc.
"Wow, you know everything about me, must be because you know everything about Western civilization and anyone who lives in it.  I guess if we have heard a few stories or were told certain 'facts' about a culture then we know any and…"
6 minutes ago
Michael J. K. added a discussion to the group Male Survivors
Thumbnail

Understanding the abuse

There really are no words to tell you what happen to me when I was sexually abused. Years later I am starting to understand more what it has done to me. I am so grateful for loving people around me who would never ever think of hurting me in any way. If only the 5 family members who hurt me from 5 to 16 would have just done the same. If they would have just left me alone. From 31 to 49 twenty five people would hurt me some only a one time thing a few were more long term several months.…See More
9 minutes ago

© 2014   Created by Brett McKay.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service